Stuart Breckenridge

FIFA's Investigation into the Display of Poppies

Over the last few weeks the Football Associations of Scotland, England, Wales, and Northern Ireland made the decision to allow their players to display poppies during international matches. FIFA have responded by launching disciplinary investigations into each Association.

Sky News:

FIFA has opened disciplinary cases against England and Scotland after their players wore armbands with poppy emblems.

[…]

Both teams face the possibility of a fine, or even a World Cup points deduction.

BBC News:

Fifa is investigating the Football Associations of Wales and Northern Ireland over poppy displays during recent games.

Fans formed a poppy mosaic ahead of Wales’ 12 November World Cup qualifier against Serbia while players wore black arm-bands.

Northern Ireland fans did likewise while their players also wore black arm bands when they hosted Azerbaijan.

While FIFA rules prohibit wearing anything that could be perceived to be a political statement, I’d argue that wearing a poppy is nothing of the sort. It is simply a sign of remembrance:

Today, they [poppies] are most common in the UK, New Zealand and Canada, and are used to commemorate their servicemen and women killed in all conflicts. — Wikipedia

I’d take the fine and points deduction every single time.


— Supported by —